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Conway Details Nearly Losing His Life & Rap Dream (Video)

Conway Details Nearly Losing His Life & Rap Dream (Video)

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Popa Wu is a person deeply involved in the lives and personal lives of the Wu-Tang Clan. He was also a one-time member of the Killa Beez collective, in addition to a 2000s solo career in Spoken Word wisdom. Today (December 16), the Hip-Hop community has learned that he has died. Members of the Wu, including GZA and Method Man, have confirmed the man’s passing this morning.

The cause of Popa Wu’s death has not been made public at this time.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

R.I.P. Popa Wu.

A post shared by GZA (@therealgza) on

Method Man Has Not Cursed On A Verse In 5+ Years. Here’s Why (Audio)

Living in Staten Island, New York, Popa Wu (whose name is sometimes stylized as “Papa Wu” and “Poppa Wu”) was involved in the life of RZA since The Abbott was an infant. He was related to RZA, GZA, and the late Ol’ Dirty Bastard, according to reports. “When RZA was born, he was put into my arms as a baby. I always told him he was going to be a great man,” the man, also known as Freedom Allah, was quoted as saying earlier this year. He appeared in Wu-Tang: Of Mics And Men at the top of 2019.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

No words! #rippopawu #theoldergodsputmeontohowtorockthis

A post shared by Method Man (@methodmanofficial) on

Popa Wu was reportedly instrumental in mentoring Clan members to the Five Percent Nation Of Gods And Earths. He was working on a memoir at the time of his passing.

Power Discusses Founding Wu-Wear & Breaks Down The Mathematics (AFH TV Video)

Amid the mid-1990s success of Wu-Tang, Popa Wu made appearances on Raekwon’s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx… (“North Star”) and Ghostface Killah’s Ironman (“All That I Got Is You”), among many others. He tackled the intro on Wu-Tang Forever, shortly before releasing his first solo album, Visions Of The 10th Chamber. He appeared on various Wu-Tang projects in the last 20 years, in addition to Lord Jamar’s 5% Album.

Ambrosia For Heads extends condolences to the Wu-Tang Clan and the family of Popa Wu.

Popa Wu is a person deeply involved in the lives and personal lives of the Wu-Tang Clan. He was also a one-time member of the Killa Beez collective, in addition to a 2000s solo career in Spoken Word wisdom. Today (December 16), the Hip-Hop community has learned that he has died. Members of the Wu, including GZA and Method Man, have confirmed the man’s passing this morning.

The cause of Popa Wu’s death has not been made public at this time.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

R.I.P. Popa Wu.

A post shared by GZA (@therealgza) on

Method Man Has Not Cursed On A Verse In 5+ Years. Here’s Why (Audio)

Living in Staten Island, New York, Popa Wu (whose name is sometimes stylized as “Papa Wu” and “Poppa Wu”) was involved in the life of RZA since The Abbott was an infant. He was related to RZA, GZA, and the late Ol’ Dirty Bastard, according to reports. “When RZA was born, he was put into my arms as a baby. I always told him he was going to be a great man,” the man, also known as Freedom Allah, was quoted as saying earlier this year. He appeared in Wu-Tang: Of Mics And Men at the top of 2019.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

No words! #rippopawu #theoldergodsputmeontohowtorockthis

A post shared by Method Man (@methodmanofficial) on

Popa Wu was reportedly instrumental in mentoring Clan members to the Five Percent Nation Of Gods And Earths. He was working on a memoir at the time of his passing.

Power Discusses Founding Wu-Wear & Breaks Down The Mathematics (AFH TV Video)

Amid the mid-1990s success of Wu-Tang, Popa Wu made appearances on Raekwon’s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx… (“North Star”) and Ghostface Killah’s Ironman (“All That I Got Is You”), among many others. He tackled the intro on Wu-Tang Forever, shortly before releasing his first solo album, Visions Of The 10th Chamber. He appeared on various Wu-Tang projects in the last 20 years, in addition to Lord Jamar’s 5% Album.

Ambrosia For Heads extends condolences to the Wu-Tang Clan and the family of Popa Wu.

One of the most iconic moments of Redman’s career is his episode of MTV Cribs. At the top of the millennium, Reggie Noble brought cameras to his Staten Island, New York residence (which he still owns). On a show known for grandeur and decadence, Funk Doc’s crib featured a DJ setup, fish sticks, passed out relatives, and a box of rainy-day dollar bills. The moment was both entertaining, but also revealing of the straightforward lifestyle of a platinum rapper, actor, and celebrity.

Almost 20 years later, Redman is doing something similar. He volunteered at Governor’s Ball, a New York City music festival. Without being paid for it, or mentioning his identity, Reggie Noble drove talent golf carts. The moment was documented on social media.

Redman Explains Why He’s The 11th Member Of Wu-Tang Clan (Video)

VIBE‘s Editor-in-Chief Datwon Thomas brought up the volunteering during the pair’s The Real Ones interview. “You would think you’re doing it as a joke,” Datwon says near the 45:00 mark.

“It just so happens that my boy Josh, who is my engineer as well, he worked festivals,” Red’ explains. “I always told him, ‘Man, I want to drive a cart at festivals,’ he was like, ‘Yo, man. You could drive for [Governor’s Ball] festival. My first job was [at Randall’s Island with them]. I drove that cart for the first time at a festival, very, very intrigued, and willing to learn. Because, like you said, people might see me on that cart and be like, ‘Oh sh*t, he bein’ corny; he havin’ fun.’ No. I’m a kinda dude that likes to start from the bottom and work my way up. I don’t like to start [at the top], talking about I’m the man, and trying to progress. Because your downfall is waiting for you when you start there.” Perhaps Redman will follow The Roots, J. Cole, Tyler, The Creator, and Lil Wayne in establishing his own festival.

Redman Reflects On MTV Cribs and What It Said About Who He Is

“I’m starting from the carts to learn how to move to stage manager,” admitted the Newark, New Jersey native. “Everything starts from the ground up. So once you get in good with the people with the carts—the ground ni**as—then you move your way up. So the cart driving was an experience to learn behind the stage and what the cart drivers go through. This year [when] I drove the cart, I had a scarf on. So they didn’t know who was drivin’ ’em. And I’ma tell you like this—on some real sh*t, not to fall off subject—but this world, y’all communication level is f*cked up right now! Because they didn’t know who I was; I was just a Black dude driving a cart. And man, ni**as get funky wit’chu!” While some artists talk down to staff, Redman asserts that he is different. “I am just so blessed; thank you, God, for making me who I am that I have the upper-hand to look outside and in of making money and being a regular person.”

Redman adds that he was wearing the bandana mask to keep away dust more than disclose his identity. However, the Def Squad lyricist did not introduce himself either. “I’m pickin’ up people in the back of my cart, and they’re not knowing who I am, and man, the funky-level, it was respectful.” He shares that later on, talent acted differently when they reached for a handshake. “A couple of ’em saw me later [without] the mask and [were stunned]. And I know they checked they self and felt [poorly for their attitudes].” He proclaims, “I’m a real ni**a, at the end of the day. I build off and I feel off energy.”

Redman Says People Who Show Money Don’t Really Have It (Video)

However, Reggie Noble suggests Heads may see him helping out backstage again. “Getting back to your question, the cart thing was a learning experience. I had fun with the Randall’s Island staff. They do that festival every year; they allow me to work every year now. I also did it to tap into the new artists. I had to drive some of the new artists, like Childish Gambino, everybody.”

At AFH TV, there is a Redman and Method Man performance video. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions.

One of the most iconic moments of Redman’s career is his episode of MTV Cribs. At the top of the millennium, Reggie Noble brought cameras to his Staten Island, New York residence (which he still owns). On a show known for grandeur and decadence, Funk Doc’s crib featured a DJ setup, fish sticks, passed out relatives, and a box of rainy-day dollar bills. The moment was both entertaining, but also revealing of the straightforward lifestyle of a platinum rapper, actor, and celebrity.

Almost 20 years later, Redman is doing something similar. He volunteered at Governor’s Ball, a New York City music festival. Without being paid for it, or mentioning his identity, Reggie Noble drove talent golf carts. The moment was documented on social media.

Redman Explains Why He’s The 11th Member Of Wu-Tang Clan (Video)

VIBE‘s Editor-in-Chief Datwon Thomas brought up the volunteering during the pair’s The Real Ones interview. “You would think you’re doing it as a joke,” Datwon says near the 45:00 mark.

“It just so happens that my boy Josh, who is my engineer as well, he worked festivals,” Red’ explains. “I always told him, ‘Man, I want to drive a cart at festivals,’ he was like, ‘Yo, man. You could drive for [Governor’s Ball] festival. My first job was [at Randall’s Island with them]. I drove that cart for the first time at a festival, very, very intrigued, and willing to learn. Because, like you said, people might see me on that cart and be like, ‘Oh sh*t, he bein’ corny; he havin’ fun.’ No. I’m a kinda dude that likes to start from the bottom and work my way up. I don’t like to start [at the top], talking about I’m the man, and trying to progress. Because your downfall is waiting for you when you start there.” Perhaps Redman will follow The Roots, J. Cole, Tyler, The Creator, and Lil Wayne in establishing his own festival.

Redman Reflects On MTV Cribs and What It Said About Who He Is

“I’m starting from the carts to learn how to move to stage manager,” admitted the Newark, New Jersey native. “Everything starts from the ground up. So once you get in good with the people with the carts—the ground ni**as—then you move your way up. So the cart driving was an experience to learn behind the stage and what the cart drivers go through. This year [when] I drove the cart, I had a scarf on. So they didn’t know who was drivin’ ’em. And I’ma tell you like this—on some real sh*t, not to fall off subject—but this world, y’all communication level is f*cked up right now! Because they didn’t know who I was; I was just a Black dude driving a cart. And man, ni**as get funky wit’chu!” While some artists talk down to staff, Redman asserts that he is different. “I am just so blessed; thank you, God, for making me who I am that I have the upper-hand to look outside and in of making money and being a regular person.”

Redman adds that he was wearing the bandana mask to keep away dust more than disclose his identity. However, the Def Squad lyricist did not introduce himself either. “I’m pickin’ up people in the back of my cart, and they’re not knowing who I am, and man, the funky-level, it was respectful.” He shares that later on, talent acted differently when they reached for a handshake. “A couple of ’em saw me later [without] the mask and [were stunned]. And I know they checked they self and felt [poorly for their attitudes].” He proclaims, “I’m a real ni**a, at the end of the day. I build off and I feel off energy.”

Redman Says People Who Show Money Don’t Really Have It (Video)

However, Reggie Noble suggests Heads may see him helping out backstage again. “Getting back to your question, the cart thing was a learning experience. I had fun with the Randall’s Island staff. They do that festival every year; they allow me to work every year now. I also did it to tap into the new artists. I had to drive some of the new artists, like Childish Gambino, everybody.”

At AFH TV, there is a Redman and Method Man performance video. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions.

Less than a month ago, The Game released his Born 2 Rap album. What is currently being touted as the Compton, California’s final LP features various homages to other songs. “The Light” (embedded below) flips the same Bobby Caldwell song as Common’s J Dilla-produced 2000 track of the same name.

The chorus of the song features Game calling his peers to challenge him in the Rap ring. “Tell Cole, ‘Step in this light’ / Tell Dot, ‘Step in this light’ / Tell Drizzy, ‘Step in this light’ / Travis Scott, step to the light” goes the first break. The second chorus beckons Chance The Rapper, Big Sean, and Future.

The Game’s Meek Mill Diss Is Not Playin’. He Warns Kendrick & Drake Are Next (Audio)

Appearing on The People’s Party With Talib Kweli, Game addresses the lyrics. Co-host Jasmin Leigh asks the veteran MC about the bars at the 22:00 mark of a nearly two-hour interview. “I tried to pick out the heavy hitters of this generation, and sort of challenge ’em. There was a few more heads that didn’t get to make the song; I couldn’t squeeze ni**as in. I had to make sure I got the ones that I felt were the most influential: the Travis Scott’s, the Future’s—of course the J. Cole and Kendrick [Lamar’s].”

Game makes it clear that he wants competitive smoke. “I would love to, on any day. When the sun next shines on the pitbull’s ass, I would love to go at lyrical warfare—just that—with some of the young MCs that I admire. And Cole and Kendrick, to be 1 and 2, I feel like Cole and Kendrick is sorta JAY-Z and Nas, but Kendrick is from [the West Coast]. I feel like they go hand-in-hand.”

The Game & Kendrick Lamar Put In Work Over a Flip of an Erykah Badu Classic (Audio)

After discussing an older rumor that Kendrick and J. were doing a collaborative LP, Game gets back to his point with “The Light.” “[I am] just challenging ni**as, and putting the disclaimer on it [that] ‘it’s only Hip-Hop, tell ni**as step in my light.’ ‘Cause I don’t want you to feel like, ‘If I say something about Game on a record, if I throw a shot, then today’s Game is gonna beat you the f*ck up or some sh*t when I see you.’ I’m far past that.”

Kweli mentions that more than six years ago, Kendrick did that on Big Sean’s “Control,” which also featured Jay Electronica. “See, that was bold. And that is Hip-Hop. And it pissed a lot of people off. But as pissed off as you were, you couldn’t. You couldn’t take away his skill.” Game urges all to think twice about ever entering lyrical warfare with K-Dot. “Don’t challenge that kid. I did it ’cause like, ‘Kids, don’t try this at home.’ I know that Kendrick would hear his name and be like [scratching chin], ‘Big brother.’ The same with Cole. But yeah, Kendrick is not to be challenged. I used to feel that [way] about Eminem in my early years. But in my mind, Kendrick has taken that.”

Game – Murder ft Scarface & Kendrick Lamar (Audio)

More than a decade ago, The Game brought Nipsey Hussle, Jay Rock, and Kendrick Lamar on tour with him.

Elsewhere, the interview includes details on why The Game is stepping away from album-making, his tense first meeting with Nipsey, and why Dr. Dre stopped working with him in the mid-2000s.

The Game & Anderson .Paak’s Collaboration Is A New Westside Story (Video)

New music by The Game is presently featured on Ambrosia For Heads‘ official playlist.

#BonusBeat: The Game’s “The Light”:

Less than a month ago, The Game released his Born 2 Rap album. What is currently being touted as the Compton, California’s final LP features various homages to other songs. “The Light” (embedded below) flips the same Bobby Caldwell song as Common’s J Dilla-produced 2000 track of the same name.

The chorus of the song features Game calling his peers to challenge him in the Rap ring. “Tell Cole, ‘Step in this light’ / Tell Dot, ‘Step in this light’ / Tell Drizzy, ‘Step in this light’ / Travis Scott, step to the light” goes the first break. The second chorus beckons Chance The Rapper, Big Sean, and Future.

The Game’s Meek Mill Diss Is Not Playin’. He Warns Kendrick & Drake Are Next (Audio)

Appearing on The People’s Party With Talib Kweli, Game addresses the lyrics. Co-host Jasmin Leigh asks the veteran MC about the bars at the 22:00 mark of a nearly two-hour interview. “I tried to pick out the heavy hitters of this generation, and sort of challenge ’em. There was a few more heads that didn’t get to make the song; I couldn’t squeeze ni**as in. I had to make sure I got the ones that I felt were the most influential: the Travis Scott’s, the Future’s—of course the J. Cole and Kendrick [Lamar’s].”

Game makes it clear that he wants competitive smoke. “I would love to, on any day. When the sun next shines on the pitbull’s ass, I would love to go at lyrical warfare—just that—with some of the young MCs that I admire. And Cole and Kendrick, to be 1 and 2, I feel like Cole and Kendrick is sorta JAY-Z and Nas, but Kendrick is from [the West Coast]. I feel like they go hand-in-hand.”

The Game & Kendrick Lamar Put In Work Over a Flip of an Erykah Badu Classic (Audio)

After discussing an older rumor that Kendrick and J. were doing a collaborative LP, Game gets back to his point with “The Light.” “[I am] just challenging ni**as, and putting the disclaimer on it [that] ‘it’s only Hip-Hop, tell ni**as step in my light.’ ‘Cause I don’t want you to feel like, ‘If I say something about Game on a record, if I throw a shot, then today’s Game is gonna beat you the f*ck up or some sh*t when I see you.’ I’m far past that.”

Kweli mentions that more than six years ago, Kendrick did that on Big Sean’s “Control,” which also featured Jay Electronica. “See, that was bold. And that is Hip-Hop. And it pissed a lot of people off. But as pissed off as you were, you couldn’t. You couldn’t take away his skill.” Game urges all to think twice about ever entering lyrical warfare with K-Dot. “Don’t challenge that kid. I did it ’cause like, ‘Kids, don’t try this at home.’ I know that Kendrick would hear his name and be like [scratching chin], ‘Big brother.’ The same with Cole. But yeah, Kendrick is not to be challenged. I used to feel that [way] about Eminem in my early years. But in my mind, Kendrick has taken that.”

Game – Murder ft Scarface & Kendrick Lamar (Audio)

More than a decade ago, The Game brought Nipsey Hussle, Jay Rock, and Kendrick Lamar on tour with him.

Elsewhere, the interview includes details on why The Game is stepping away from album-making, his tense first meeting with Nipsey, and why Dr. Dre stopped working with him in the mid-2000s.

The Game & Anderson .Paak’s Collaboration Is A New Westside Story (Video)

New music by The Game is presently featured on Ambrosia For Heads‘ official playlist.

#BonusBeat: The Game’s “The Light”:

Carson, California MC Reason has been quietly dropping bombs since signing with Top Dawg Entertainment. After TDE’s re-release of his debut mixtape, There You Have It, 2019 has been a year in which Reason spent sharpening his Rap abilities before gearing up to release his first batch of single under his label, presumably to showcase to the world that he can run with the other top dogs: Kendrick Lamar, Ab-Soul, ScHoolboy Q, Jay Rock and Isaiah Rashad. A month ago, Reason released the banging “Same Ol’ Sh*t,” followed by a Ab-Soul collaboration, “Flick It Up.”

More recently, Reason took to REAL 92.3 LA to show everyone his freestyle skills. Turns out, he’s as sharp on the mic as he is with a pen. As soon as DJ Hed preps Reason with an instrumental of “Get Money” by Junior M.A.F.I.A., Reason lays in hard for nearly four minutes straight. He switches his flow and weaves through the beat with ease, dropping clever punchlines and moving onto the next rap before you can process them. One of those standouts: “I’ve been focused lately, so h*es turn to CVS, how they been open lately / My girl asks why I love strippers and dancers / I had to Sway her, I ain’t have the answers.”

Reason Describes His Journey From Hungry MC To TDE’s Next Top Dawg (AFH TV Video)

His bars are smooth on delivery, as seen with raps that feel seamless: “Couple of my homies students, couple rockin’ bandanas / I been telling both sides I’m just try’na understand ’em / Cousin walking around lettin’ triggers squeeze / Kept a 50 on the roll-up with a den of thieves.” He also drops a few punchline that makes DJ Hed gasp, mainly: “My dreams on a horse racin’ / I win with a point shaven / Been working my joints aching, /I rap ’til my voice strainin’ / And there’s pain in it, came from the struggle, took some L’s but stayed wit’ it / ‘Cause L’s like laundry, always some Gain in it.

There’s no word right now about a Reason debut album, but for now, as he assures DJ Hed, no one will be able to top his freestyle for the rest of the year. He also assures everyone that he had the best verse on “Lambo Truck,” a song from Dreamville’s Grammy-nominated compilation album, Revenge Of The Dreamers III, which also featured Cozz and Childish Major.

Reason Is Not Your Same Ol’ Rapper. He Continues To Show He’s Built To Last (Audio)

Video interviews with Reason, including an episode of “Where It All Began,” are available at AFH TV. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions. New music by Reason is currently on the official Ambrosia For Heads’ Playlist.

Carson, California MC Reason has been quietly dropping bombs since signing with Top Dawg Entertainment. After TDE’s re-release of his debut mixtape, There You Have It, 2019 has been a year in which Reason spent sharpening his Rap abilities before gearing up to release his first batch of single under his label, presumably to showcase to the world that he can run with the other top dogs: Kendrick Lamar, Ab-Soul, ScHoolboy Q, Jay Rock and Isaiah Rashad. A month ago, Reason released the banging “Same Ol’ Sh*t,” followed by a Ab-Soul collaboration, “Flick It Up.”

More recently, Reason took to REAL 92.3 LA to show everyone his freestyle skills. Turns out, he’s as sharp on the mic as he is with a pen. As soon as DJ Hed preps Reason with an instrumental of “Get Money” by Junior M.A.F.I.A., Reason lays in hard for nearly four minutes straight. He switches his flow and weaves through the beat with ease, dropping clever punchlines and moving onto the next rap before you can process them. One of those standouts: “I’ve been focused lately, so h*es turn to CVS, how they been open lately / My girl asks why I love strippers and dancers / I had to Sway her, I ain’t have the answers.”

Reason Describes His Journey From Hungry MC To TDE’s Next Top Dawg (AFH TV Video)

His bars are smooth on delivery, as seen with raps that feel seamless: “Couple of my homies students, couple rockin’ bandanas / I been telling both sides I’m just try’na understand ’em / Cousin walking around lettin’ triggers squeeze / Kept a 50 on the roll-up with a den of thieves.” He also drops a few punchline that makes DJ Hed gasp, mainly: “My dreams on a horse racin’ / I win with a point shaven / Been working my joints aching, /I rap ’til my voice strainin’ / And there’s pain in it, came from the struggle, took some L’s but stayed wit’ it / ‘Cause L’s like laundry, always some Gain in it.

There’s no word right now about a Reason debut album, but for now, as he assures DJ Hed, no one will be able to top his freestyle for the rest of the year. He also assures everyone that he had the best verse on “Lambo Truck,” a song from Dreamville’s Grammy-nominated compilation album, Revenge Of The Dreamers III, which also featured Cozz and Childish Major.

Reason Is Not Your Same Ol’ Rapper. He Continues To Show He’s Built To Last (Audio)

Video interviews with Reason, including an episode of “Where It All Began,” are available at AFH TV. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions. New music by Reason is currently on the official Ambrosia For Heads’ Playlist.

After more than six months of campaigning, Scarface’s pivot to politics is on hold—at least temporarily. The Rap legend, also known as Brad Jordan, announced in June that he planned to run for Houston City Council in District D.

This morning (December 15), following several runoffs, ‘Face lost to Carolyn Evans-Shabazz in the final tally, following Saturday’s ballots. According to KHou 11, ‘Face received 38% of the vote. The news station, who calls the candidate “Brad ‘Scarface’ Jordan,” says that all votes have been tallied.

Scarface’s Political Agenda Is Just Like His Music: Revolutionary (Video)

In recent weeks and months, Scarface said that he was putting rapping away for his pursuit in politics. He told Slim Thug’s podcast that his political agenda included reparations and police reform, among other policies.

In June, the Geto Boys member also suggested long-term plans to get to the White House. However, earlier this year, E-40 revealed that he and Scarface are planning a collaborative album following their first song together. Other collabo’ projects—including one with DJ Quik where Scarface plays guitar and Quik plays drums—have also said to be in the works.

Scarface Says He Is The GOAT MC & Explains Why

Scarface has not publicly responded to the results at press time.

At AFH TV, there are video interviews with Scarface, J. Prince, Spice 1, and more. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions.

After more than six months of campaigning, Scarface’s pivot to politics is on hold—at least temporarily. The Rap legend, also known as Brad Jordan, announced in June that he planned to run for Houston City Council in District D.

This morning (December 15), following several runoffs, ‘Face lost to Carolyn Evans-Shabazz in the final tally, following Saturday’s ballots. According to KHou 11, ‘Face received 38% of the vote. The news station, who calls the candidate “Brad ‘Scarface’ Jordan,” says that all votes have been tallied.

Scarface’s Political Agenda Is Just Like His Music: Revolutionary (Video)

In recent weeks and months, Scarface said that he was putting rapping away for his pursuit in politics. He told Slim Thug’s podcast that his political agenda included reparations and police reform, among other policies.

In June, the Geto Boys member also suggested long-term plans to get to the White House. However, earlier this year, E-40 revealed that he and Scarface are planning a collaborative album following their first song together. Other collabo’ projects—including one with DJ Quik where Scarface plays guitar and Quik plays drums—have also said to be in the works.

Scarface Says He Is The GOAT MC & Explains Why

Scarface has not publicly responded to the results at press time.

At AFH TV, there are video interviews with Scarface, J. Prince, Spice 1, and more. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions.

Manhattan native Marlon Craft has been making the best of his opportunities by delivering top-notch freestyles that show off his skills. For those not in the know, Craft came across Rap honestly and as the son of a Jazz musician. From there, he showcased an adept style that instantly endeared him to Hip-Hop fans across the web. A graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., where he designed his own major, Urban Education and Social Justice, Craft moved back to Manhattan Plaza and began making freestyle videos and posting them online.

It was there that he exhibited his vociferous flows over beats, and packaged songs into his first of two EPs in 2016. After a feature on Masta Ace & Marco Polo’s acclaimed A Breukelen Story in 2018, Marlon Craft has proven himself to be ahead of the pack in 2019 with Funhouse Mirror. Despite not being selected for this year’s XXL Freshman list, the New York MC still showcased why his wordplay is as solid as the Rock of Gibraltar. Craft brought his brand of uniqueness to HOT 97 with Funkmaster Flex to leave it up to the viewers if he can flat-out rap his ass off.

Marlon Craft Says He’s Mos Def, Talib Kweli & Nas Combined In A Fiery Freestyle

After explaining his background to Flex, the two get right down to brass tacks for #140 of the infamous freestyle series. DJ Juanito drops the needle on a Mafioso-styled beat for Craft to curate to and the Hell’s Kitchen, Manhattan native lines up a beastly bevy of bars for our appetites. “Don’t compare me to them other dudes you about to compare me to / Ain’t worth about the time to get ate / Man, they barely food,” he spits right out the gate. In what sounded like an attempt to express his intentions to the Hip-Hop world, Craft laces up his LeBron’s to let the competition know that he’s not sweating them.

Unafraid and unabashed, Craft’s uniqueness on the M-I-C comes from his consistent cadence and captivating usage of the consonants: “Chips, I bet a few / Lost some but dope is my set of moves / Now, I got a better view / So even though my count down, I’m still like… two hands ahead of dudes / And trust me, you can slapped with either, I’m tellin’ you / Only thing saving you is how crazy be my schedule / Try’na balance malice while putting together clips for online / Like I was Pusha in ’09 / Speeding where I don’t speak the language on road signs / And for me, go-time is go-time.

Marlon Craft’s Video Calls Out The Real American Gangsters

With all his energy focused on the folks at home viewing this on their screens, Marlon Craft is coming for the competition’s fan-base through sheer hard work, effort, and some buzz worthy bars that made for a “run that back” experience: “Look, I don’t need validation / I’m calibrating / Get respect, don’t have to chase it / O.G.’s could f*ck themselves, if need be / Should I dare masturbate, I’m not Kraft / Kill anyone in his path, you can cry, but do not laugh / You’ll be sorry / Frustration and bitterness, those past methods / I always had skills, just ain’t have leverage / Sh*t, I was throwing punches like Cass’ Clay / But like Ali I needed time to hone my last name / I need legacy, I’m looking past fame.

From then on, the former Team Backpack champ of The Mission Underground competition delivered a closing 2019 salvo to those who did make the XXL Freshman’s list: “Only work with family and legends, that’s the criteria / And ain’t one Freshman that’s strikin’ fear in the rear of my head interior / I ain’t with Rap squabbles, I just want to be cheerier / Mostly I’m a sad dude / ‘Cause this is my least valued currency, but sh*t, cash rules / No tattoos / My exterior blank, but my sleeves filled with my heart and all my past wounds,” he spits. “I’m in the bathroom doing power poses, fighting anxiety / I’m still mad cool, I just don’t gotta try to be.

King Los Kicks The Year’s Best Freestyle. MCs Should Be Shook (Video)

On singles such as “Shallow,” featuring Dizzy Wright, and “Gang Sh*t,” the latter which dropped recently in June — Craft engages the controversies and injustices of the day. In the latter, he plays in the song’s accompanying music video three roles that are as American as apple pie in this country: a racist white police officer, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, and a Black man serving prison time for an armed robbery. Such issues are important to the MC, which makes this particular flip of lines interesting as the music industry could use another advocate to carry the Hip-Hop torch across the bridge to the other side:

But any loss is just a prelude / ‘Cause you can turn L’s to a W, if you just adjust the angle / The sh*t that hurt you is the sh*t that make you / Growth comes at the point of resistance and if it’s one thing I can do, sh*t, is ma’f*ckin’ train, duke / So I held myself back until I became a monster / So shout-out to all my fears, feel like they my sponsors / They in concert / Gave me conscious / Made me conquer / Made me bonkers / Made me ponder how to bump with all this sh*t that made me somber / Almost got ate, but ’round 24, it made me Mamba.

Locksmith Rips 2 Amazing Freestyles. Fat Joe Declares That He May Be The Best (Video)

Funhouse Mirror, released on Same Plate/Sony, features production by Statik Selektah and Black Milk.

#BonusBeat: Marlon Craft’s “Do The Work” music video:

Manhattan native Marlon Craft has been making the best of his opportunities by delivering top-notch freestyles that show off his skills. For those not in the know, Craft came across Rap honestly and as the son of a Jazz musician. From there, he showcased an adept style that instantly endeared him to Hip-Hop fans across the web. A graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., where he designed his own major, Urban Education and Social Justice, Craft moved back to Manhattan Plaza and began making freestyle videos and posting them online.

It was there that he exhibited his vociferous flows over beats, and packaged songs into his first of two EPs in 2016. After a feature on Masta Ace & Marco Polo’s acclaimed A Breukelen Story in 2018, Marlon Craft has proven himself to be ahead of the pack in 2019 with Funhouse Mirror. Despite not being selected for this year’s XXL Freshman list, the New York MC still showcased why his wordplay is as solid as the Rock of Gibraltar. Craft brought his brand of uniqueness to HOT 97 with Funkmaster Flex to leave it up to the viewers if he can flat-out rap his ass off.

Marlon Craft Says He’s Mos Def, Talib Kweli & Nas Combined In A Fiery Freestyle

After explaining his background to Flex, the two get right down to brass tacks for #140 of the infamous freestyle series. DJ Juanito drops the needle on a Mafioso-styled beat for Craft to curate to and the Hell’s Kitchen, Manhattan native lines up a beastly bevy of bars for our appetites. “Don’t compare me to them other dudes you about to compare me to / Ain’t worth about the time to get ate / Man, they barely food,” he spits right out the gate. In what sounded like an attempt to express his intentions to the Hip-Hop world, Craft laces up his LeBron’s to let the competition know that he’s not sweating them.

Unafraid and unabashed, Craft’s uniqueness on the M-I-C comes from his consistent cadence and captivating usage of the consonants: “Chips, I bet a few / Lost some but dope is my set of moves / Now, I got a better view / So even though my count down, I’m still like… two hands ahead of dudes / And trust me, you can slapped with either, I’m tellin’ you / Only thing saving you is how crazy be my schedule / Try’na balance malice while putting together clips for online / Like I was Pusha in ’09 / Speeding where I don’t speak the language on road signs / And for me, go-time is go-time.

Marlon Craft’s Video Calls Out The Real American Gangsters

With all his energy focused on the folks at home viewing this on their screens, Marlon Craft is coming for the competition’s fan-base through sheer hard work, effort, and some buzz worthy bars that made for a “run that back” experience: “Look, I don’t need validation / I’m calibrating / Get respect, don’t have to chase it / O.G.’s could f*ck themselves, if need be / Should I dare masturbate, I’m not Kraft / Kill anyone in his path, you can cry, but do not laugh / You’ll be sorry / Frustration and bitterness, those past methods / I always had skills, just ain’t have leverage / Sh*t, I was throwing punches like Cass’ Clay / But like Ali I needed time to hone my last name / I need legacy, I’m looking past fame.

From then on, the former Team Backpack champ of The Mission Underground competition delivered a closing 2019 salvo to those who did make the XXL Freshman’s list: “Only work with family and legends, that’s the criteria / And ain’t one Freshman that’s strikin’ fear in the rear of my head interior / I ain’t with Rap squabbles, I just want to be cheerier / Mostly I’m a sad dude / ‘Cause this is my least valued currency, but sh*t, cash rules / No tattoos / My exterior blank, but my sleeves filled with my heart and all my past wounds,” he spits. “I’m in the bathroom doing power poses, fighting anxiety / I’m still mad cool, I just don’t gotta try to be.

King Los Kicks The Year’s Best Freestyle. MCs Should Be Shook (Video)

On singles such as “Shallow,” featuring Dizzy Wright, and “Gang Sh*t,” the latter which dropped recently in June — Craft engages the controversies and injustices of the day. In the latter, he plays in the song’s accompanying music video three roles that are as American as apple pie in this country: a racist white police officer, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, and a Black man serving prison time for an armed robbery. Such issues are important to the MC, which makes this particular flip of lines interesting as the music industry could use another advocate to carry the Hip-Hop torch across the bridge to the other side:

But any loss is just a prelude / ‘Cause you can turn L’s to a W, if you just adjust the angle / The sh*t that hurt you is the sh*t that make you / Growth comes at the point of resistance and if it’s one thing I can do, sh*t, is ma’f*ckin’ train, duke / So I held myself back until I became a monster / So shout-out to all my fears, feel like they my sponsors / They in concert / Gave me conscious / Made me conquer / Made me bonkers / Made me ponder how to bump with all this sh*t that made me somber / Almost got ate, but ’round 24, it made me Mamba.

Locksmith Rips 2 Amazing Freestyles. Fat Joe Declares That He May Be The Best (Video)

Funhouse Mirror, released on Same Plate/Sony, features production by Statik Selektah and Black Milk.

#BonusBeat: Marlon Craft’s “Do The Work” music video:

Graffiti pioneer and art legend Phase 2 has passed away. The Bronx, New York native, born Lonny Wood, succumbed to a battle with Lou Gehrig’s Disease. A report by HipHopDX claims that Phase 2 had been hospitalized due to complications from ALS since August. Apart from writing and painting, he participated in Hip-Hop as a DJ and MC.

“I started writing before the concept of doing pieces was conceived. Whoever wants to claim that they were writing in 1950, so be it, but when it comes to the initial foundations of style, I’m their daddy. [I am responsible for] arrows, loops, bubble or softie letters, a whole shabang of sh*t that no one else was doing prior to it,” he told author and scholar Adam Mansbach. “I started out with LEE 163d! I’m the type of person, if I see something I like, I’ma do it. But his existence was what influenced me to go out there. Me and LEE grew up together, ran together, knew each other forever—he was doing it, and I felt like that was something I wanted to f*ck with, so we teamed up. We were the cats who really set that sh*t off in the BX; there weren’t even 20 guys who were doing it, and everybody was paying attention to us, picking up on what we were doing.” Phase 2 also credited himself with starting the famed “writer’s bench” at 149th & Grand Concourse.

Futura 2000 Is A Graffiti Legend Who Continues To Leave His Mark On The Globe

Phase 2 is often credited with pioneering the bubble style lettering in graffiti. At Hip-Hop’s onset, he created party flyers and artwork for the likes of Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa. These commissions were planned by Phase during the 1970s. “When I went to Grandmaster Flash’s manager to suggest making flyers to advertise their jams, there really wasn’t anything like that happening, and that’s why I suggested it,” Wood said in an interview with AIGA, as reported by Okay Player. “What you did have were big Merengue posters by Salsa Kenny and Izzy Sanabria, but we weren’t really promoting jams on any real level like that. I thought that it made sense to, so I started doing flyers for Flash, and then the wave came behind it.”

Flip The Script: Graffiti Writers Are Awarded Millions After Their Works Were Painted Over

That role creating visual extensions of the culture continued well into the 1990s and 2000s. On social media, El-P, who founded Definitive Jux Recordings, remembered working with Phase on Company Flow flyers as well as works for the label.

Wood also grew up with another Hip-Hop multi-threat, Lord Finesse. The two BX representatives shared a floor in Building 965 within the Forest Projects.

Taggers Played an Integral Role in Graffiti’s Rise. A New Film Tells Their Story (Video)

DJ Premier, R.A. The Rugged Man, Debbie D, and Dante Ross are among the other prominent Hip-Hop artists to pay tribute to Phase 2.

DX also reports that Phase 2 remained active painting skateboard decks, vinyl, and working in fine arts.

Ambrosia For Heads extends condolences to the family and friends of Phase 2.

Graffiti pioneer and art legend Phase 2 has passed away. The Bronx, New York native, born Lonny Wood, succumbed to a battle with Lou Gehrig’s Disease. A report by HipHopDX claims that Phase 2 had been hospitalized due to complications from ALS since August. Apart from writing and painting, he participated in Hip-Hop as a DJ and MC.

“I started writing before the concept of doing pieces was conceived. Whoever wants to claim that they were writing in 1950, so be it, but when it comes to the initial foundations of style, I’m their daddy. [I am responsible for] arrows, loops, bubble or softie letters, a whole shabang of sh*t that no one else was doing prior to it,” he told author and scholar Adam Mansbach. “I started out with LEE 163d! I’m the type of person, if I see something I like, I’ma do it. But his existence was what influenced me to go out there. Me and LEE grew up together, ran together, knew each other forever—he was doing it, and I felt like that was something I wanted to f*ck with, so we teamed up. We were the cats who really set that sh*t off in the BX; there weren’t even 20 guys who were doing it, and everybody was paying attention to us, picking up on what we were doing.” Phase 2 also credited himself with starting the famed “writer’s bench” at 149th & Grand Concourse.

Futura 2000 Is A Graffiti Legend Who Continues To Leave His Mark On The Globe

Phase 2 is often credited with pioneering the bubble style lettering in graffiti. At Hip-Hop’s onset, he created party flyers and artwork for the likes of Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa. These commissions were planned by Phase during the 1970s. “When I went to Grandmaster Flash’s manager to suggest making flyers to advertise their jams, there really wasn’t anything like that happening, and that’s why I suggested it,” Wood said in an interview with AIGA, as reported by Okay Player. “What you did have were big Merengue posters by Salsa Kenny and Izzy Sanabria, but we weren’t really promoting jams on any real level like that. I thought that it made sense to, so I started doing flyers for Flash, and then the wave came behind it.”

Flip The Script: Graffiti Writers Are Awarded Millions After Their Works Were Painted Over

That role creating visual extensions of the culture continued well into the 1990s and 2000s. On social media, El-P, who founded Definitive Jux Recordings, remembered working with Phase on Company Flow flyers as well as works for the label.

Wood also grew up with another Hip-Hop multi-threat, Lord Finesse. The two BX representatives shared a floor in Building 965 within the Forest Projects.

Taggers Played an Integral Role in Graffiti’s Rise. A New Film Tells Their Story (Video)

DJ Premier, R.A. The Rugged Man, Debbie D, and Dante Ross are among the other prominent Hip-Hop artists to pay tribute to Phase 2.

DX also reports that Phase 2 remained active painting skateboard decks, vinyl, and working in fine arts.

Ambrosia For Heads extends condolences to the family and friends of Phase 2.

Last night (December 12), actor Danny Aiello died at the age of 86 in New Jersey. A native New Yorker, Aiello was nominated for an Academy Award for his role of “Sal Fragione” in Spike Lee’s 1989 film Do The Right Thing. He also appeared in The Godfather Part II, Moonstruck, Once Upon A Time In America, Fort Apache The Bronx, and Harlem Nights, to name a few titles in a career that spanned more than 50 years. According to TMZ, Aiello suffered a recent, undisclosed infection.

Apart from film, Aiello was a veteran of the stage. In the 1980s, one of his most active decades, he also starred in the music video for Madonna’s “Papa Don’t Preach.” Before acting, he was a bouncer at New York City’s comedy club, The Improv. The Manhattan native remained active in his career through 2019.

Actor Bill Nunn Who Created The Iconic “Radio Raheem” Role Has Passed Away

In 1989, Aiello spoke to The Chicago Tribune about working on what became the most recognized role of his extensive career.”When I looked at the [Do The Right Thing] script, I looked at it as making fun of racism. It is serious, there’s no question. But it appeared in the first 70 pages to be culture comedy. Italian-Americans make fools of themselves, Blacks make fools of themselves, the Koreans [doing the same] So everyone sort of looks like an idiot for a moment. Spike was very even-handed about that.” He continued, “And then I saw the devastating turn that it took, somewhere 15 minutes from the end. That was obvious even on paper. However, there was one weak person in that film, and it was my character. I told Spike I didn’t think the character was fulfilling enough. I didn’t say I wouldn’t do it, but I said I would like to have some input-by me-into that character. Would that be all right? He said, ‘Anything you wanna do. Whatever you wanna do, you do. Whatever.’ You know, it`s a great compliment to him to lack ego in that area.” In that interview, he revealed that he took that license, writing and orchestrating the pizzeria window scene with his character’s son “Pino,” played by John Turturro. That scene is embedded below. He praised the writing of Lee, particularly in the film’s iconic montage sequence of racial slurs and stereotypes.

“It is with profound sorrow to report that Danny Aiello, beloved husband, father, grandfather, actor, and musician passed away last night after a brief illness,” his family said in a statement published by ABC News. “The family asks for privacy at this time.”

Salute To Spike Lee for 25 Years Of Do The Right Thing (Video)

Spike Lee posted a photo of him and Aiello from earlier this year. The two New Yorkers reconnected for 20th and 30th-anniversary celebrations surrounding Do The Right Thing.

Aiello is survived by wife, Sandy Cohen. The couple was together for more than 60 years. They have four children.

#BonusBeat: One of Danny Aiello’s most iconic Do The Right Thing scenes:

Last night (December 12), actor Danny Aiello died at the age of 86 in New Jersey. A native New Yorker, Aiello was nominated for an Academy Award for his role of “Sal Fragione” in Spike Lee’s 1989 film Do The Right Thing. He also appeared in The Godfather Part II, Moonstruck, Once Upon A Time In America, Fort Apache The Bronx, and Harlem Nights, to name a few titles in a career that spanned more than 50 years. According to TMZ, Aiello suffered a recent, undisclosed infection.

Apart from film, Aiello was a veteran of the stage. In the 1980s, one of his most active decades, he also starred in the music video for Madonna’s “Papa Don’t Preach.” Before acting, he was a bouncer at New York City’s comedy club, The Improv. The Manhattan native remained active in his career through 2019.

Actor Bill Nunn Who Created The Iconic “Radio Raheem” Role Has Passed Away

In 1989, Aiello spoke to The Chicago Tribune about working on what became the most recognized role of his extensive career.”When I looked at the [Do The Right Thing] script, I looked at it as making fun of racism. It is serious, there’s no question. But it appeared in the first 70 pages to be culture comedy. Italian-Americans make fools of themselves, Blacks make fools of themselves, the Koreans [doing the same] So everyone sort of looks like an idiot for a moment. Spike was very even-handed about that.” He continued, “And then I saw the devastating turn that it took, somewhere 15 minutes from the end. That was obvious even on paper. However, there was one weak person in that film, and it was my character. I told Spike I didn’t think the character was fulfilling enough. I didn’t say I wouldn’t do it, but I said I would like to have some input-by me-into that character. Would that be all right? He said, ‘Anything you wanna do. Whatever you wanna do, you do. Whatever.’ You know, it`s a great compliment to him to lack ego in that area.” In that interview, he revealed that he took that license, writing and orchestrating the pizzeria window scene with his character’s son “Pino,” played by John Turturro. That scene is embedded below. He praised the writing of Lee, particularly in the film’s iconic montage sequence of racial slurs and stereotypes.

“It is with profound sorrow to report that Danny Aiello, beloved husband, father, grandfather, actor, and musician passed away last night after a brief illness,” his family said in a statement published by ABC News. “The family asks for privacy at this time.”

Salute To Spike Lee for 25 Years Of Do The Right Thing (Video)

Spike Lee posted a photo of him and Aiello from earlier this year. The two New Yorkers reconnected for 20th and 30th-anniversary celebrations surrounding Do The Right Thing.

Aiello is survived by wife, Sandy Cohen. The couple was together for more than 60 years. They have four children.

#BonusBeat: One of Danny Aiello’s most iconic Do The Right Thing scenes:

In the last month, Griselda released its first group album, WWCD ((What Would Chine Gunn Do) on Shady Records. The project unites Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine, and Benny The Butcher for their first full-length release as a trio. Since signing with Eminem in 2017, the collective has independently garnered tremendous acclaim, and widespread attention for solo releases, including Wes’ Supreme Blientele, Benny’s The Plugs I Met, and Conway’s Everybody Is F.O.O.D. series.

Another longtime Shady Records artist and affiliate, Royce 5’9 was an early supporter of Griselda. In 2016, he enlisted Conway and Wes’ to join him and Styles P on “Banjo.” The song was included on the Trust The Shooter. A year later, Nickel joined the Hall N Nash brothers on Parks & Passport Gift’s “Amen,” as well as appearing on The Machine’s G.O.A.T. (Grimiest Of All Time) and W.S.G. – H*tler On Steroids mixtapes, respectively. Then, one year ago, the Bad Meets Evil MC was the veteran guest on Benny’s Tana Talk 3 highlight “Who Are You.”

Daringer & Beat Butcha Detail Producing Griselda’s Album Without Samples (Video)

Before the group signed with Shady as well as since, Royce 5’9 has been a Griselda believer. Appearing on The Joe Budden Podcast With Rory & Mal, he explains how he’s coached the trio of MCs and their producer, Daringer, to avoid some of the pitfalls that hurt a super-group at the top of the decade. After one eponymous independent album, Royce, Joe Budden, Kxng Crooked (aka Crooked I), and Joell Ortiz signed with Eminem’s label. The resulting release, 2012’s welcome to: Our HOUSE very nearly topped the charts. However, the major label LP was viewed by some vocal fans as a disconnect from expectations that the quartet could bring their best game to the mainstream.

Speaking on the show at the 96:00 mark, it is at 1:17:00 where Royce recalls his words of wisdom to Griselda, and how they’ve moved differently than Slaughterhouse. “As soon as [Westside] Gunn and them came around, the first time that they came to my studio way back in the day, that’s where the preaching from me started. [I was] just taking [about Slaughterhouse’s] experiences [and applying them to Griselda] as soon as they signed to Shady.” He continues, “Sometimes people listen, sometimes they don’t, but the good thing about them is that all the little nuances about Slaughterhouse that made it to where it was hard to take it to that [next] level, they don’t have those. They’re like a unit; they’re all from Buffalo. They’re actually like a crew.”

Royce Tells Joe Budden He Has A New Album & It Will Bring Budden Out Of Retirement

Westside Gunn and Conway are brothers, with Benny being a cousin. Meanwhile, there are defined positions. Royce explains, “Gunn is more in control of the aesthetics. A lot of things that you see is his taste level, and everybody [else] kind of plays a role. [Meanwhile], Slaughterhouse was like four separate entities of guys who had dreams. We all got dreams, so I think we took it way further than I think even we thought it could go. But we made our mistakes. I can definitely take the blame for some of the creative mistakes.”

Royce admits that the mistakes include him. “I know for a fact I felt really good about ‘My Life,’ going into it. And the only reason I felt really good about it is because I was judging it off of the experiences of something else with the Bad Meets Evil [2011’s Hell: The Sequel album]. So it’s like a misfire; I just thought it was the logical next step. I felt it in my heart, so when it didn’t connect, I felt good about it, because I knew exactly why.” Later in the discussion, Royce suggests he empathizes with the perspectives of both Joe and Crooked since the April 2018 disbanding. While Budden has vowed he’s retired from Rap, his former band-mate has opened up about his frustrations surrounding the group’s third album and final days. The two appeared together in a since-deleted episode of Pull Up. As recently as this October, Crooked I said he hopes the quartet can someday give fans a proper send-off LP.

Kxng Crooked Is Brutally Honest About The Breakup Of Slaughterhouse (Video)

Royce’s coaching echoes what many longtime Griselda fans are praising about WWCD. “I just told Gunn and them, ‘Just stay consistent with what you guys are doing. Keep doin’ what you’re doing; don’t change nothing—and that’s it, and it’ll grow.’ They’re naturally gonna grow as artists. Each time they go back in, it’s gonna be the next step up without having to reach for that step up. We reached for that step up, because we were accused of being not able to go there. And then Joe had a hit, so we were just in a different space than them. It’s hard.” Joe tells Mal, who initially asks Royce to compare and contrast, “that was gonna be my answer to that question, too.”

At 1:23:00, Joe Budden states his case in comparing the two groups. “Listen, [I] love Griselda to death, but boy, they are afforded quite a few luxuries that we were not.” Budden accused Eminem of too much creative input and lack of resources during the two men’s back-and-forth media run in late 2018. Mal then asks what. “Like being able to be themselves,” responds Budden. “And not change. Ever. ‘That same BPM? We doin’ this.’ That’s it; that’s one.” Royce chimes in, “But they built that aesthetic with the fans. They’re like a hybrid of a lot of different things, which makes it the first time that we’ve seen that. And they realize what the fans were following—even with the merchandise, they know exactly what it is about them that the fans like. [When] we came together, we didn’t even know, ‘Why they like us so much?’ [Laughing] Me and you would just film ourselves talking, and people would eat the sh*t up. It wasn’t planned, bro. It’s just way different. Plus, we were way bigger than Griselda. So I wish somebody would say that, and stop acting like [we were not successful]. We did the Nokia Theater, ni**a; 3,000 people.” Royce and Joe laugh about Budden getting arrested that night.

Royce 5’9, T.I. & CyHi Use Bold Bars To Redefine The Meaning Of Savage (Video)

Earlier this week, Royce confirmed his eighth album, The Allegory (artwork embedded below). Entirely self-produced, he says the follow-up to 2018’s The Book Of Ryan (named one of Ambrosia For Heads’ best) will arrive next month on Heaven Studios/eOne. He speaks about the concept and process making the album while appearing on the podcast.

Video interviews with Royce 5’9 as well as Griselda are available at AFH TV. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions. New music by Benny, Conway, Wes’, and Royce is all presently on the official AFH Playlist.

Joe Budden Says He Encouraged Slaughterhouse To Replace Him (Video)

#BonusBeat: Royce 5’9’s The Allegory artwork:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

#TheAllegory Coming 2020 art design: @scruffgod

A post shared by πŸ‹πŸΏNickleπŸ‹πŸΏ (@royceda59) on

In the last month, Griselda released its first group album, WWCD ((What Would Chine Gunn Do) on Shady Records. The project unites Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine, and Benny The Butcher for their first full-length release as a trio. Since signing with Eminem in 2017, the collective has independently garnered tremendous acclaim, and widespread attention for solo releases, including Wes’ Supreme Blientele, Benny’s The Plugs I Met, and Conway’s Everybody Is F.O.O.D. series.

Another longtime Shady Records artist and affiliate, Royce 5’9 was an early supporter of Griselda. In 2016, he enlisted Conway and Wes’ to join him and Styles P on “Banjo.” The song was included on the Trust The Shooter. A year later, Nickel joined the Hall N Nash brothers on Parks & Passport Gift’s “Amen,” as well as appearing on The Machine’s G.O.A.T. (Grimiest Of All Time) and W.S.G. – H*tler On Steroids mixtapes, respectively. Then, one year ago, the Bad Meets Evil MC was the veteran guest on Benny’s Tana Talk 3 highlight “Who Are You.”

Daringer & Beat Butcha Detail Producing Griselda’s Album Without Samples (Video)

Before the group signed with Shady as well as since, Royce 5’9 has been a Griselda believer. Appearing on The Joe Budden Podcast With Rory & Mal, he explains how he’s coached the trio of MCs and their producer, Daringer, to avoid some of the pitfalls that hurt a super-group at the top of the decade. After one eponymous independent album, Royce, Joe Budden, Kxng Crooked (aka Crooked I), and Joell Ortiz signed with Eminem’s label. The resulting release, 2012’s welcome to: Our HOUSE very nearly topped the charts. However, the major label LP was viewed by some vocal fans as a disconnect from expectations that the quartet could bring their best game to the mainstream.

Speaking on the show at the 96:00 mark, it is at 1:17:00 where Royce recalls his words of wisdom to Griselda, and how they’ve moved differently than Slaughterhouse. “As soon as [Westside] Gunn and them came around, the first time that they came to my studio way back in the day, that’s where the preaching from me started. [I was] just taking [about Slaughterhouse’s] experiences [and applying them to Griselda] as soon as they signed to Shady.” He continues, “Sometimes people listen, sometimes they don’t, but the good thing about them is that all the little nuances about Slaughterhouse that made it to where it was hard to take it to that [next] level, they don’t have those. They’re like a unit; they’re all from Buffalo. They’re actually like a crew.”

Royce Tells Joe Budden He Has A New Album & It Will Bring Budden Out Of Retirement

Westside Gunn and Conway are brothers, with Benny being a cousin. Meanwhile, there are defined positions. Royce explains, “Gunn is more in control of the aesthetics. A lot of things that you see is his taste level, and everybody [else] kind of plays a role. [Meanwhile], Slaughterhouse was like four separate entities of guys who had dreams. We all got dreams, so I think we took it way further than I think even we thought it could go. But we made our mistakes. I can definitely take the blame for some of the creative mistakes.”

Royce admits that the mistakes include him. “I know for a fact I felt really good about ‘My Life,’ going into it. And the only reason I felt really good about it is because I was judging it off of the experiences of something else with the Bad Meets Evil [2011’s Hell: The Sequel album]. So it’s like a misfire; I just thought it was the logical next step. I felt it in my heart, so when it didn’t connect, I felt good about it, because I knew exactly why.” Later in the discussion, Royce suggests he empathizes with the perspectives of both Joe and Crooked since the April 2018 disbanding. While Budden has vowed he’s retired from Rap, his former band-mate has opened up about his frustrations surrounding the group’s third album and final days. The two appeared together in a since-deleted episode of Pull Up. As recently as this October, Crooked I said he hopes the quartet can someday give fans a proper send-off LP.

Kxng Crooked Is Brutally Honest About The Breakup Of Slaughterhouse (Video)

Royce’s coaching echoes what many longtime Griselda fans are praising about WWCD. “I just told Gunn and them, ‘Just stay consistent with what you guys are doing. Keep doin’ what you’re doing; don’t change nothing—and that’s it, and it’ll grow.’ They’re naturally gonna grow as artists. Each time they go back in, it’s gonna be the next step up without having to reach for that step up. We reached for that step up, because we were accused of being not able to go there. And then Joe had a hit, so we were just in a different space than them. It’s hard.” Joe tells Mal, who initially asks Royce to compare and contrast, “that was gonna be my answer to that question, too.”

At 1:23:00, Joe Budden states his case in comparing the two groups. “Listen, [I] love Griselda to death, but boy, they are afforded quite a few luxuries that we were not.” Budden accused Eminem of too much creative input and lack of resources during the two men’s back-and-forth media run in late 2018. Mal then asks what. “Like being able to be themselves,” responds Budden. “And not change. Ever. ‘That same BPM? We doin’ this.’ That’s it; that’s one.” Royce chimes in, “But they built that aesthetic with the fans. They’re like a hybrid of a lot of different things, which makes it the first time that we’ve seen that. And they realize what the fans were following—even with the merchandise, they know exactly what it is about them that the fans like. [When] we came together, we didn’t even know, ‘Why they like us so much?’ [Laughing] Me and you would just film ourselves talking, and people would eat the sh*t up. It wasn’t planned, bro. It’s just way different. Plus, we were way bigger than Griselda. So I wish somebody would say that, and stop acting like [we were not successful]. We did the Nokia Theater, ni**a; 3,000 people.” Royce and Joe laugh about Budden getting arrested that night.

Royce 5’9, T.I. & CyHi Use Bold Bars To Redefine The Meaning Of Savage (Video)

Earlier this week, Royce confirmed his eighth album, The Allegory (artwork embedded below). Entirely self-produced, he says the follow-up to 2018’s The Book Of Ryan (named one of Ambrosia For Heads’ best) will arrive next month on Heaven Studios/eOne. He speaks about the concept and process making the album while appearing on the podcast.

Video interviews with Royce 5’9 as well as Griselda are available at AFH TV. We are currently offering free 7-day trial subscriptions. New music by Benny, Conway, Wes’, and Royce is all presently on the official AFH Playlist.

Joe Budden Says He Encouraged Slaughterhouse To Replace Him (Video)

#BonusBeat: Royce 5’9’s The Allegory artwork:

 

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#TheAllegory Coming 2020 art design: @scruffgod

A post shared by πŸ‹πŸΏNickleπŸ‹πŸΏ (@royceda59) on

Just under three weeks ago (November 29), Griselda released their debut collaborative album on Shady Record, WWCD. The trio comprised of Buffalo, New York rappers Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine, and Benny The Butcher released their first LP as a unit. WWCD arrived on Eminem’s Shady Records imprint and featured 50 Cent as well as a new, crew-love remix of Conway and Em’s “Bang.”

To celebrate the release, Griselda has been unveiling a documentary series about WWCD‘s creation. Two weeks ago, viewers got an inside look at the-come up of Griselda as a group and their deep, ongoing ties to Buffalo. Last week, the spotlight was given to WWCD producers, Daringer and Beat Butcha. Griselda’s in-house mastermind and the hit-maker for BeyoncΓ©, JAY-Z, and Drake teamed to honor the GxFR grit, without relying on any samples. This week, in the third documentary installment, “May Street,” Griselda focuses the spotlight on Conway.

Daringer & Beat Butcha Detail Producing Griselda’s Album Without Samples (Video)

At the start of the documentary, Conway details surviving gunshots to his head, his neck, and shoulder in 2012. These life-threatening injuries permanently affecting his body, and preventing him from being able to control the right side of his face. He showed these wounds on 2015’s Reject 2 album, one of the many releases that Griselda used on its grind to prominent recognition. In the doc, he tells the cameras: “It was harder to talk and do anything, as far as my body… But that made me go much more harder, ’cause I ain’t much to do but to think of raps and sh*t, just think about the comeback.” Con’ was making waves via a mixtape circuit, grinding and promoting his own music on the streets before the shooting occurred. The time he took to recover was used to sharpen his craft, and obviously, the rapper is thankful. “So, to see [Griselda] coming up, to unfold the ways it’s unfolding, and as fast as I’m floating, and the love that I’m getting… I remember crying in the mirror, real sh*t, I remember crying and looking at the mirror, like, ‘Look at me, man.'”

The documentary then shifts to Conway in the studio alongside his Rap partners, Westside Gunn and Benny The Butcher, showing off the rapper’s writing and recording process while sporting a Prodigy t-shirt. He notes that the last time all three rappers have been able to work together was 2016, as the trio had focused on their respective solo careers since their initial breakthrough successes. The Machine details his time spent in the studio: “I’m just locked in and focused on the process. I’m just excited to see the end-game when we get to the finish line when this sh*t all said and done. What have we accomplished? How much history and groundbreaking sh*t we did. That’s the exciting part to me, ’cause that’s what we been doing so far, and we’re gonna continue doing it.”

Westside Gunn, Conway & Benny Will Never Compromise The Griselda Sound (AFH TV Video)

Although many fans have learned of Conway’s greatness in the last two years, the work goes back quite a ways. “You gotta understand, Conway was the illest n*gga in Buffalo,” Westside Gunn says about his brother and Hall N Nash partner. Notably, the Griselda artists are now managed by JAY-Z’s Roc Nation. “Conway was like the JAY-Z of Buffalo, like for real. Can’t nobody f*ck with him.”

Earlier this year, Conway released E.I.F.3 (Everybody Is F.O.O.D. 3) and Look What I Became.

Benny, Conway & 38 Spesh Rewrite A Page Out Of Scarface’s Diary (Audio Premiere)

AFH TV recently interviewed Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine, and Benny The Butcher about the album and the Griselda movement. There is also a separate Plugs I Met conversation with Benny. We are currently offering free 7-day trials.

Songs by Conway, Griselda, as well as Conway features with Skyzoo & Pete Rock, Smoke DZA & Pete Rock, and Jericho Jackson (Elzhi & Khrysis) are currently on the official Ambrosia For Heads Playlist.

Just under three weeks ago (November 29), Griselda released their debut collaborative album on Shady Record, WWCD. The trio comprised of Buffalo, New York rappers Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine, and Benny The Butcher released their first LP as a unit. WWCD arrived on Eminem’s Shady Records imprint and featured 50 Cent as well as a new, crew-love remix of Conway and Em’s “Bang.”

To celebrate the release, Griselda has been unveiling a documentary series about WWCD‘s creation. Two weeks ago, viewers got an inside look at the-come up of Griselda as a group and their deep, ongoing ties to Buffalo. Last week, the spotlight was given to WWCD producers, Daringer and Beat Butcha. Griselda’s in-house mastermind and the hit-maker for BeyoncΓ©, JAY-Z, and Drake teamed to honor the GxFR grit, without relying on any samples. This week, in the third documentary installment, “May Street,” Griselda focuses the spotlight on Conway.

Daringer & Beat Butcha Detail Producing Griselda’s Album Without Samples (Video)

At the start of the documentary, Conway details surviving gunshots to his head, his neck, and shoulder in 2012. These life-threatening injuries permanently affecting his body, and preventing him from being able to control the right side of his face. He showed these wounds on 2015’s Reject 2 album, one of the many releases that Griselda used on its grind to prominent recognition. In the doc, he tells the cameras: “It was harder to talk and do anything, as far as my body… But that made me go much more harder, ’cause I ain’t much to do but to think of raps and sh*t, just think about the comeback.” Con’ was making waves via a mixtape circuit, grinding and promoting his own music on the streets before the shooting occurred. The time he took to recover was used to sharpen his craft, and obviously, the rapper is thankful. “So, to see [Griselda] coming up, to unfold the ways it’s unfolding, and as fast as I’m floating, and the love that I’m getting… I remember crying in the mirror, real sh*t, I remember crying and looking at the mirror, like, ‘Look at me, man.'”

The documentary then shifts to Conway in the studio alongside his Rap partners, Westside Gunn and Benny The Butcher, showing off the rapper’s writing and recording process while sporting a Prodigy t-shirt. He notes that the last time all three rappers have been able to work together was 2016, as the trio had focused on their respective solo careers since their initial breakthrough successes. The Machine details his time spent in the studio: “I’m just locked in and focused on the process. I’m just excited to see the end-game when we get to the finish line when this sh*t all said and done. What have we accomplished? How much history and groundbreaking sh*t we did. That’s the exciting part to me, ’cause that’s what we been doing so far, and we’re gonna continue doing it.”

Westside Gunn, Conway & Benny Will Never Compromise The Griselda Sound (AFH TV Video)

Although many fans have learned of Conway’s greatness in the last two years, the work goes back quite a ways. “You gotta understand, Conway was the illest n*gga in Buffalo,” Westside Gunn says about his brother and Hall N Nash partner. Notably, the Griselda artists are now managed by JAY-Z’s Roc Nation. “Conway was like the JAY-Z of Buffalo, like for real. Can’t nobody f*ck with him.”

Earlier this year, Conway released E.I.F.3 (Everybody Is F.O.O.D. 3) and Look What I Became.

Benny, Conway & 38 Spesh Rewrite A Page Out Of Scarface’s Diary (Audio Premiere)

AFH TV recently interviewed Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine, and Benny The Butcher about the album and the Griselda movement. There is also a separate Plugs I Met conversation with Benny. We are currently offering free 7-day trials.

Songs by Conway, Griselda, as well as Conway features with Skyzoo & Pete Rock, Smoke DZA & Pete Rock, and Jericho Jackson (Elzhi & Khrysis) are currently on the official Ambrosia For Heads Playlist.



via https://www.DMT.NEWS/

Kevin Cortez, Khareem Sudlow, DMTDaily